The LGBT Health & Development Program

Women’s Health and Sexuality Quiz Text

Resources:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – Diseases and Conditions
Howard Brown Health Center – Lesbian Community Care Project
Break the Cycle – Empowering Youth to End Domestic Violence
American Social Health Association – How to Communicate
Consent is Sexy
Scarleteen – Sex ed for the real world
GLSEN – Gay Lesbian and Straight Education Network
National Conference of State Legislatures – Same-Sex Marriage, Civil Unions, and Domestic Partnerships
AVERTing HIV and AIDS – Lesbians, Bisexual Women and Safe Sex
American Journal of Preventive Medicine – Smoking Among Lesbians, Gays, and Bisexuals
AIDS Foundation of Chicago – Fact Sheets
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Students At Greater Risk for Unhealthy, Unsafe Behaviors
American Cancer Society – Breast Cancer
National Cancer Institute – Pap Tests and Cervical Health
Chicago Female Condom Campaign – Put a ring on it!
The Body – LGBT Youth Fact Sheet
Youth Noise – Top 10 Sexy Ways to Use Condoms

Quiz #1: Let’s Talk About Sex, Baby.

1. You can discuss all of these topics with your health provider: Fitness & Nutrition, Emotional Health, Sexual Health, Gynecological Health, Breast Health, Heart Health, Bone Health, Tobacco, Substance & Alcohol Use, Domestic Violence.
TRUE: Any and ALL of the aforementioned topics can and SHOULD be discussed with your health care provider.
Additional Information: Howard Brown Health Center – Lesbian Community Care Project

2. Domestic violence occurs only in straight relationships.
FALSE: Domestic violence occurs in same-sex relationships at about the same rate as it does in heterosexual relationships.
Additional Information:Break the Cycle – Empowering Youth to End Domestic Violence

3. The term “boundaries” refers to things you will or won’t do based on safety, health, and values.
TRUE: It’s important to discuss boundaries as it relates to sex. Consensual sex is sex where both (or all) parties involved are willing participants.
Additional Information: American Social Health Association – How to Communicate

4. Communicating about sexual boundaries with a partner ruins the mood.
FALSE: Although talking about boundaries can be uncomfortable, it ultimately leads to better and safer sex for all members involved because it allows for open communication lines.

5. Consent is about boundaries, but asking your partner’s permission to touch him/her is unnecessary.
FALSE: How can you know if you don’t ask? Consent can look like a lot of things. It can refer to any number of activities: communicating, touching, talking, etc. Consent is about making sure you and your partner(s) are healthy, safe, and feel comfortable during relationships and/or sexual interactions.
Additional Information: Scarleteen – Sex ed for the real world

6. Consent means more than just saying “yes” before sex.
TRUE: Between sexual partners the agreement—or “consent”—to sexual practices must be given freely and can be withdrawn at any point. If consent is withdrawn, then the other person must stop.
Additional Information: Scarleteen – Sex ed for the real world

7. The average age for coming out in the U.S. is 16.
TRUE: Studies have shown that the average age gay/lesbian youth begin the coming out process is 16, compared to the 1980’s when it was between 19 and 23. However, according to GLSEN, data from recent studies on LGB adolescents suggest age of first awareness may range from 8 to 11 years on average.
Additional Information: GLSEN – Gay Lesbian and Straight Education Network

8. There are only 2 states in the U.S. that grant same-sex marriage licenses.
FALSE: As of July, 2011, there are actually 6: Connecticut, Iowa, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, D.C., & New York. The following 7 states currently offer civil unions or domestic partnerships: New Jersey, New Hampshire, Oregon, Washington, Nevada, Illinois, & Hawaii.
Additional Information: National Conference of State Legislatures – Same-Sex Marriage, Civil Unions, and Domestic Partnerships

9. Illinois was the first state to decriminalize homosexuality.
TRUE: In 1961 the home state of the IMPACT Program (Illinois) removed sodomy law from its criminal code (effective 1962).
Additional Information: PFLAG – Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays

Quiz #2: Know Your Health. Know Yourself.

1. Women who have sex with women are NOT at risk for HIV/AIDS.
FALSE: Four bodily fluids can transmit HIV: blood, semen, vaginal fluids, and breast milk. Women who have sex with women can be exposed to ALL four of these. Remember: BEHAVIOR, NOT IDENTITY, is what puts a person at risk for HIV.
Additional Information: AVERTing HIV and AIDS – Lesbians, Bisexual Women and Safe Sex

2. Women’s Sexual Health is about physical wellness, not emotional health.
FALSE: Women’s Sexual Health is about physical wellness as well as mental, emotional, and social health, and this quiz will touch on all of these topics.
Additional Information: Howard Brown Health Center – Lesbian Community Care Project

3. Women who have sex with women don’t have to wear condoms because there’s no risk for pregnancy.
FALSE: Protecting against unwanted pregnancy is only one function of a condom. Women who have sex with women must also protect themselves against STIs and HIV by using barriers like condoms and dental dams during sex.
Additional Information: AVERTing HIV and AIDS – Lesbians, Bisexual Women and Safe Sex

4. Lesbian women canNOT transmit HIV through needle sharing.
FALSE: Sharing needles and/or syringes with an HIV-positive person for injecting drugs, tattooing, or piercing is one way that a lesbian woman can become infected or infect others with HIV. Lesbians can be exposed to HIV through blood, vaginal fluid, semen, and breast milk. Also, HIV-positive lesbian women can transmit HIV to their babies during pregnancy or birth. To prevent HIV infection, use protection (condoms, dental dams, etc.) with EVERY sex act, & clean needles and/or syringes for injections, tattooing, and piercing.
Additional Information: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
AVERTing HIV and AIDS – Lesbians, Bisexual Women and Safe Sex

5. Heart disease is the #1 killer of women in the United States.
TRUE: Heart disease is the #1 killer of women in the U.S. and for lesbians, the risk of heart disease may be even higher. Factors that increase the risk of heart disease include obesity, smoking, stress, lack of exercise, and culture.
Additional Information: American Heart Association – Go Red for Women

6. Lesbians smoke at alarmingly higher rates than heterosexual women.
TRUE: LGBT individuals are 40-70% more likely to smoke than non-LGBT individuals. Factors that contribute to increased smoking rates in this community include social stress, bar culture, higher rates of alcohol consumption, and direct targeting of LGBT consumers by tobacco corporations.
Additional Information: American Journal of Preventive Medicine – Smoking Among Lesbians, Gays, and Bisexuals

7. Ethnic minority women, especially African Americans & Latinas, are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS.
TRUE: In the United States, the HIV incidence rate for black women is nearly 15 times higher than that of white women, and the rate among Hispanic/Latina women is nearly four times that of white women. In Illinois, 74% of women diagnosed with HIV in 2009 were African American and 13% were Latina. In Chicago, 80% of new HIV infections among women in 2009 were African-American and 12% were Latina.
Additional Information: AIDS Foundation of Chicago – Fact Sheets

8. Heterosexual women abuse alcohol at a higher rate than queer women.
FALSE: Queer women abuse alcohol at 3 times the rate of heterosexual women on average.
Additional Information: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

9. Obesity puts a woman at greater risk for breast cancer.
TRUE: Obesity is a major risk factor for breast cancer. Other risk factors include getting older, being uninsured, using tobacco, not getting pregnant, not breastfeeding your baby, difficulty accessing health care, and not receiving routine breast cancer screenings. Bottom line: No woman is immune, but we can all do our part to lessen the likelihood of disease. Begin by KNOWING YOUR BODY.
Additional Information: American Cancer Society – Breast Cancer

Quiz #3: Protection Precedes S(expression).

1. Women who have sex with women don’t need condoms because pregnancy is not their problem.
FALSE: Protecting against unwanted pregnancy is only one function of a condom. Women who have sex with women must also protect themselves against STIs & HIV by using barriers like condoms and dental dams during sex.
Additional Information: AVERTing HIV and AIDS – Lesbians, Bisexual Women and Safe Sex

2. A woman who has sex with women does not need a Pap test.
FALSE: All women should get a Pap test ANNUALLY at a minimum. Lesbians and bisexual women need Pap tests on a regular basis, just as heterosexual women do!
Additional Information: National Cancer Institute – Pap Tests and Cervical Health

3. I have latex allergies so there aren’t any condom options that work for me.
FALSE: You have SEVERAL options in condoms made from alternative materials, such as polyurethane. Also, the female condom (FC2) is made from nitrile, a synthetic rubber, which is hypo-allergenic and can be used with ANY kind of lubricant. NOTE: Lambskin condoms are also an option for preventing pregnancy, but DO NOT protect against HIV/STIs.
Additional Information: Chicago Female Condom Campaign – Put a ring on it!

4. Bisexual women have lower rates of pregnancy than straight women.
FALSE: Rates of unintended pregnancy amongst bisexual women were actually found to be twice the rate amongst straight women.
Additional Information: The Body – LGBT Youth Fact Sheet

5. I’m on the Pill, so I do NOT have to worry about using a condom.
FALSE: The Pill does NOT protect against STIs and HIV.
Additional Information: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – Contraception

6. Nearly ALL sexually active women between the ages of 15 and 44 have used or are using at least ONE contraceptive method.
TRUE: Everybody’s DOING IT: 99%+ of sexually active women, ages 15 to 44, have used or ARE using at least ONE contraceptive method.
Additional Information: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – Contraception

7. Using two condoms at once is double the protection.
FALSE: Wearing two condoms at once can cause friction, which leads to breakage, making the condom ineffective as a barrier against STIs, HIV, and/or pregnancy.
Additional Information: Youth Noise – Top 10 Sexy Ways to Use Condoms

8. Male condoms/female condoms (FC2s)/dental dams have expiration dates.
TRUE: Unlike fine wines, condoms and dental dams DO expire and it’s important to check the expiration date because these prevention tools may no longer be as effective beyond the date printed on the package. ALSO: Store condoms and dental dams in cool, dry places away from direct sunlight because heat can cause latex to deteriorate, making them more likely to break.
Additional Information: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – Barrier Protection Update

9. The removable inner ring of the FC2 can be taken out for anal sex.
TRUE: During anal sex, the inner ring can be removed or kept in, depending on what feels better for you. But, in order for the FC2 to be effective during vaginal sex, the inner ring must remain inside.
Additional Information: Chicago Female Condom Campaign – Put a ring on it!

Quiz #4: Getting Wise on STI’s

1. Lesbians canNOT get HPV or genital warts.
FALSE: HPV or genital warts are transmitted skin-to-skin, genital-to-genital, or mouth-to-genital and are easily transmitted between women during sex.
Additional Information: Centers for Disease Control – Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

2. There are multiple kinds of HPV and not all of them cause health problems.
TRUE: There are over 100 types of HPV, but types 16 and 18 cause about 70% of cervical cancers, and types 6 and 11 cause about 90% of genital warts.
Additional Information: Centers for Disease Control – Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

3. There are multiple ways to determine whether your HPV can lead to cervical cancer.
FALSE: A Pap test is the ONLY way to determine if there are abnormal and possibly cancerous cells on a cervix.
Additional Information: National Cancer Institute – Pap Tests and Cervical Health

4. A woman who has sex with women cannot get chlamydia.
FALSE: Women who have sex with women CAN get chlamydia through vaginal, anal, OR oral sex.
Additional Information: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – Chlamydia

5. Lesbians cannot contract or spread gonorrhea.
FALSE: Lesbians can transmit gonorrhea through contact with a penis, vagina, mouth, or anus. Gonorrhea can also be spread from a pregnant mother to her baby during childbirth.
Additional Information: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – Gonorrhea

6. Syphilis can be treated.
TRUE: Syphilis is curable in its early stages with antibiotics and can also be treated in the later stages. However, having syphilis once does not protect you from getting it again. Also, treatments cannot reverse any internal damage that syphilis has already done to your body.
Additional Information: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – Syphilis

7. Older women are more susceptible to STIs.
TRUE: Women of ALL ages are at risk, but women of certain ages are especially vulnerable to STIs. Post-menopausal women may be at increased risk due to vaginal dryness & thinning of the membrane, which may lead to small tears or abrasions, allowing infections to enter the bloodstream more easily. Women under 25 are also at increased risk of STIs because the cervix is not yet fully developed & is therefore less resistant to infection. ALL WOMEN must be aware of the bodily changes that will occur over their lifespan in order to protect themselves appropriately.
Additional Information: STDtesting.com – Women at Higher Risk for STDs

8. Gardasil is a new sexual position.
FALSE: Gardasil is the first cervical cancer vaccine and has been highly effective in preventing four types of HPV in young women who have not been previously exposed to HPV.
Additional Information: Gardasil – Human Papillomavirus Vaccine

9. Gardasil can also be used to combat current cases of HPV.
FALSE: The vaccine will not effectively treat existing HPV infections OR their complications.
Additional Information: Gardasil – Human Papillomavirus Vaccine



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